ICCB 2015 Program Spotlight: Take the Poster Pledge

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by Edd Hind (re-posted from IMCC3 content, with edits)

Edd Hind presenting a poster during a poster session at a previous conference. Going to poster sessions is important to poster presenters and benefits those who attend.

Edd Hind presenting a poster during a poster session at a previous conference. Going to poster sessions is important to poster presenters and benefits those who attend.

As anybody who has been to the International Marine Conservation Congresses or the International Congresses for Conservation Biology will know, the program of talks, symposia, workshops and events is action-packed. It’s why the conferences are so good. However, there is a danger that with so many choices, you miss making one of the most important choices of your whole conference: to make sure you attend the Poster Sessions. There will be three poster sessions at ICCB ECCB 2015: Monday, August 3, 17:15-18:30; Tuesday, August 4, 17:15-18:30; Wednesday, August 5, 17:15-18:30.

As a poster presenter at IMCC1 in Washington, DC, I can’t speak highly enough of the chance I had to discuss my research with those who took the time to come and talk to me about governance of Filipino marine protected areas. However, attending poster sessions is not just about making presenters feel worthwhile… It’s also about the benefits to you!

We asked Twitter why you should attend a poster session, and this is what people had to say:

“[The] same reason as why you should attend talks. To learn about new research in your field.” (@whysharksmatter)

“Personal interactions with presenters.” (@bgrassbluecrab)

“Reviewing for oral presentations can be much more conservative, really interesting ideas can get their first airing in a poster.” (@Craken_MacCraic)

“There are some hidden gems.” (@RJlilley)

“I like posters as you can display different types of data. Some of my most out-of-the-box work has been a poster.” (@Craken_MacCraic)

“{If there is] Provision of wine […] … more delegates pitch up and they are chattier!” (@TalkinOceans)

“Poster sessions are […] friendly – less nerve wracking and tend to be in the evening.” (@Craken_MacCraic)

“You have the chance to engage with with poster presenters and gain more insights into great work.” (@samoester)

“Beer!” (@ChrisDarimont)

And my favorite, from a recent graduate:

“I was interviewed by someone who had a poster at a conference I attended. Never saw her poster. #doh #stoopid”

So there you go… a few of a myriad of excellent reasons for attending conference poster sessions. Take the poster pledge with me and promise to yourself and the poster presenters that you will be there.

-Edd Hind is the Communication Officer for the Marine Section of the Society for Conservation Biology. He is also the Communication Chair for IMCC4, to be held 30 July-3 August 2016.

*The International Marine Conservation Congress in the biennial conference of SCB’s Marine Section.

*The International Congress for Conservation Biology is the conference of the Society for Conservation Biology.

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ICCB 2015 Marine Presenter Highlight: Diogo Veríssimo on Social Marketing for Conservation

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Dr. Diogo Veríssimo will be presenting at #ICCB2015

Dr. Diogo Veríssimo will be presenting at #ICCB2015

Dr. Diogo Veríssimo, works on the application of marketing principles to address biodiversity conservation challenges. His research has focused, amongst other topics such as conservation conflict or the wildlife trade, on the use of marketing principles to select, evaluate and use conservation flagships, and on the understanding of the drivers of field and online donations to conservation NGOs. Diogo is currently a David H. Smith Conservation research fellow, where he is working with Rare, the NGO that pioneered the use of social marketing to achieve conservation goals, to design more effective impact evaluation practices,  and to better understand social return on investment of social marketing campaigns.

Diogo’s presentation at the ICCB ECCB 2015 will review the impact of conservation interventions that aim to influence human behavior through non-regulatory and non-pecuniary incentives. This presentation will be part of the Symposium “Conservation Marketing: a new path to understanding and influencing human behaviour” which will bring together conservation academics and practitioners together with marketing professionals from the commercial sector to present and discuss the application of marketing in conservation projects. The talks will focus on subjects as broad as the marketing of marine protected areas (MPAs), the effectiveness of celebrities to communicate conservation messages and the use of social marketing to communicate with decision makers. This Symposium will also be linked to the launch of the newly created SCB working group on Conservation Marketing and Engagement.

You can find out more about Diogo’s work by following him on Twitter @verissimodiogo or by checking out his website.

ICCB Field Trips: Salty Excursions

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Do your suffer from aqualust? Ache no more! You can revel in the Mediterranean at the 27th International Congress for Conservation Biology. Held in conjunction with the 4th European Congress for Conservation Biology, ICCB 2015 is in Montpellier, France, famous for is beautiful seaside.

The following ICCB field trips are still available. If you have already registered for the conference, you can still add a field trip by emailing the registration department at iccb-eccb2015@europa-organisation.com. The subject line of your email should indicate the type of product you wish to add (field trip).

Field trip n°20: Marine mammals: Discover of the Gulf of Lion Marine Nature Park

© Compagnie Maritime Roussillon Croisières

© Compagnie Maritime Roussillon Croisières

On this field trip, you will navigate the  Mediterranean Sea on a high-speed motor-boat. You will see bottlenose dolphins in the Gulf of Lion, and hopefully reach submarine canyon areas significant depth favors the presence of several cetaceans, including Cuvier’s beaked whale, as well as loggerhead turtles, sharks and sunfish.

  • This is a full-day field trip on Sunday, August 2, 201
  • This field trip is 110€ per participant.
  • It is planned to leave Montpellier at 6:45 (6:45am) and return to Montpellier at 19:30 (7:30pm).
  • If there is inclement weather, this trip may be rescheduled for Friday, August 7, 2015.

Field trip n°19: Marine protected natural zones: Banyuls-sur-Mer Oceanological Observatory

© Shutterstock

© Shutterstock

On this field trip, you will travel to the Oceanographic Observatory, meet marine scientists researching the local area, snorkel through the natural reserve and explore important coastal habitats. The Oceanographic Observatory, founded in 1881, is located in Languedoc-Roussillon. It became a laboratory of the National Scientific Research Centre (CNRS) in 1967, and an internal school of the Pierre et Marie Curie University (UPMC)
in 1985. Located on a rocky coast close to the Spanish border, it benefits from its proximity to diverse habitats.

  • This is a full-day field trip on Friday, August 7, 2015.
  • This field trip is 60€ per participant.
  • It is planned to leave Montpellier at 8:00 (8:00am) and return to Montpellier at 20:30 (8:30pm).

Field trip n°17: National Park: Discovery of the Calanques National Park by hybrid propulsion boat

©PNCal

©PNCal

Created in 2012 at the gateway to a metropolis of nearly a million inhabitants, the Calanques National Park is the only continental, insular and marine national park in the Mediterranean. The National Park boasts 60 marine heritage species and has 14 habitats deemed as rare and fragile under the EEC Habitat Directive. You may encounter numerous fish and invertebrates, incuding the salema porgy, white
seabream, rainbow wrasse, seahorse, spiny sea urchin or
the noble pen shell.

  • This is a full-day field trip on Friday, August 7, 2015.
  • This field trip is 60€ per participant.
  • It is planned to leave Montpellier at 7:00 (7:00am) and return to Montpellier at 19:30 (7:30pm).

ICCB Social Event: SCB Marine Section & Freshwater Working Group Form AquaForce

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CGmBIPAUcAA_ivqAt the 27th International Congress for Conservation Biology in Montpellier, France, in August, the Marine Section and Freshwater Working Group of the Society for Conservation Biology are collaborating to host the SCB Aquatic social event to celebrate the Life Aquatic. The joint social for members and potential members will feature a wine and cheese tasting at Le Comte Brasserie & Cheese Bar in Montpellier and casual visits to nearby pubs and cafés. The AquaForce will also be selling SCB Aquatic swag during the event and throughout the conference, with proceeds benefiting the Marine Section and the Freshwater Working Group.

Marine Section and Freshwater Working Group Joint Social

Tuesday, 4 August, 7:30 pm
Le Comte Brasserie & Cheese Bar
31 Rue de Chio, 34000 Montpellier

The Marine Section and the Freshwater Working Group invite members and those interested in becoming members to our first ever joint social! We’ll start with a fantastic wine and cheese tasting at a local cheese shop and then migrate out to the great local nightlife scene.  The first 25 people to sign up get in FREE for the tasting (email SCB Marine Section Board Member Leslie Cornick at lcornick@alaskapacific.edu to sign up)! After that, tickets will be €60 so that we can raise funds for more great events! Maximum capacity for the tasting is 50 people, so sign up early! Our theme is The Life Aquatic. We’ll have great beanies and wine glasses with our new joint logo for sale throughout the congress and at the social. Proceeds will benefit the Freshwater Working Group and the Marine Section.

Mockup of the SCB Aquatic beanie. Proceeds will jointly benefit the Marine Section and Freshwater Working Group.

Mock-up of the SCB Aquatic beanie. Proceeds will jointly benefit the Marine Section and Freshwater Working Group.

Mock-up of the SCB Aquatic stemless wine glass. Proceeds will jointly benefit the Marine Section and the Freshwater Working Group.

Mock-up of the SCB Aquatic stemless wine glass. Proceeds will jointly benefit the Marine Section and the Freshwater Working Group.

ICCB 2015 MARINE PRESENTATION HIGHLIGHT: ELASTICITY IN ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

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Anemone fish 04

By Fraser Hartley

The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment highlighted the role of ecosystem services for human wellbeing, suggesting a positive relationship between ecosystem health and human wellbeing. Yet improvements in human wellbeing sometimes coincide with ecosystem degradation, while increase in ecosystem condition may not ubiquitously led to increase in the wellbeing of people dependent on the ecosystem. This points to a complex relationship between ecosystems and wellbeing. If we wish to influence and inform policy and society about the importance of ecosystems services, and how services need to be managed, a more coherent knowledge is needed about how changes affect the production, transfer and ability of people to access benefits.

The provision of services by an ecosystem can be broken down into a chain of elements, from ‘stocks’ (e.g. coral reef condition), to ‘flows’ (wave attenuation/aquarium species), to ‘goods’(shoreline protection/type of fish landed), to ‘value’ (how the market or society values the goods) and eventually to ‘wellbeing contribution’ (physical security/ income). The relationships between these elements are mediated by different ecological and social processes, which determine the sensitivity of human wellbeing to ecosystem change, a concept we have termed ‘ecosystem service elasticity’. ES elasticity can often differ depending on the context and individual circumstances of individuals. For example, if corals on a reef bleached, the shoreline protection chain is likely to be little impacted in the short-medium term (low stock-flow elasticity). However, since aquarium fish species are often dependent on live corals, fishers in the aquarium trade are likely to see significant decreases in ‘goods’ (high stock-flow elasticity). While the former example is likely to be broadly applicable to coastal communities, the latter will only be relevant to a small number of people or families within the community.

At ICCB 2015, my presentation will explain how the members of the Sustainable Poverty Alleviation from Social Ecosystem Services (SPACES) project are exploring the concept of ES elasticity through a large ecological and social dataset across multiple individual coastal services in East Africa. This process has illustrated a wide range of social and ecological factors as mechanisms that enhance or reduce ES elasticity. For example, high cultural significance, or lack of alternatives can enhance ES elasticity, while social mechanisms that limit access to ecosystem services can reduce elasticity. Mapping out how these individual services are interlinked can illustrate how different types of value and wellbeing are linked to each other and to common ecological stocks and access mechanisms,suggesting potential interventions aimed at poverty alleviation and sustainable ecosystems while identifying possible ecosystem service trade-offs and winners and losers.

The SPACES project is funded through the UK Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme. Learn more about SPACES work at http://www.espa-spaces.org. ESPA is funded by the Department for International Development (DFID), the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), and the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). Fraser Hartley is an Associate Research Fellow in Geography at the University of Exeter.

ICCB 2015 Marine Presenter Highlight: Leslie Cornick on Marine Mammals in the Arcitc

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Dr. Leslie Cornick, SCB Marine Section board member, will be presenting at ICCB 2015 in August. (Photo courtesy of Leslie Cornick)

Dr. Leslie Cornick, SCB Marine Section board member, will be presenting at ICCB-ECCB 2015 in August. (Photo courtesy of Leslie Cornick)

Dr. Leslie Cornick, SCB Marine Section board member, has been studying marine mammals in Alaska for the past 15 years. She studies the physiological limits to behavioral plasticity in a changing ocean environment. As marine mammals in Alaska and the Arctic respond to climate change by changing their foraging patterns and migration pathways, subsistence users face changes in access to their most important source of fat and protein, as well the potential loss of deep cultural traditions. In her presentation at ICCB ECCB 2015, Cornick will examine the issue of community resilience and adaption as communities adapt to changes in access to these resources. ICCB 2015, the 27th International Congress for Conservation Biology, will be held in conjunction with the 4th European Congress for Conservation Biology on August 2-6, 2015 in Montpellier, France.

ICCB 2015 Presentation: Community Resilience and Adaption in a Changing Arctic: Policy Challenges and Opportunities  for Marine Mammal Subsistence Users

Presentation Time and Location: Coming soon