Plenary Focus: Dr. Heather Koldewey Highlights Positive Examples of Marine Conservation

Standard
Dr. Heather Koldewey, marine biologist and seahorse specialist, will be featured as a plenary speaker at the 3rd International Marine Conservation Congress in August 2014. (Photo courtesy of Heather Koldewey)

Dr. Heather Koldewey, marine biologist and seahorse specialist, will be featured as a plenary speaker at the 3rd International Marine Conservation Congress in August 2014.
(Photo courtesy of Heather Koldewey)

Dr. Heather Koldewey is involved in several projects around the world, making her familiar with the diverse difficulties in marine research, as well as incidences of conservation success. The Head of Global Conservation Programmes for the Zoological Society of London, she is also a co-founder of Project Seahorse. She strives to directly engage aquariums in marine conservation initiatives and has researched the impact of the aquarium trade on marine fishes and invertebrates. She is currently involved in marine conservation projects in the Philippines, Mozambique, Cameroon and the UK Overseas Territories, particularly the Chagos archipelago and the Pitcairn Islands.

Koldewey has led innovative approaches and partnerships at ZSL and will be speaking at the 3rd International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC3) on hope and innovation in marine conservation. Koldewey explains that many marine conservation issues have been identified, and she hopes to inspire action to realize the means to resolve those issues. “By highlighting some positive examples in marine conservation, I hope to generate more energy behind the replication of positive case studies and build on solutions,” she stated.

Koldewey is considered an expert of many facets of conservation. She has studied topics such as marine and freshwater conservation, seahorse biology and genetics, the impacts of aquaculture and sustainable seafood, to name a few. For her doctoral dissertation, she studied the genetics of brown trout (Salmo trutta) in Welsh rivers. She is a research associate at University College London and the University of Exeter. She is also a board member of the Chagos Conservation Trust and Shark Trust. Additionally, she is the Chair of the Fish Section of the IUCN Re-introduction Specialist Group and a UK government zoo inspector.

Koldewey said she is honored to be a plenary speaker for IMCC3. She stated, “IMCC3 provides an extraordinary opportunity to capitalize on having an international, diverse, high-caliber group of people in the same place at the same time, to focus on solutions and make big, bold and positive changes for our oceans. I feel lucky to have the chance to share my experiences – and to listen and to learn.”

Koldewey will be featured as an IMCC3 plenary speaker on 15 August 2014 at the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre in Glasgow to kick off the main scientific program.

Follow Koldewey on Twitter @HeatherKoldewey.

Samantha Oester is Communications Chair for IMCC3. She can be reached at soester@gmu.edu for information on the IMCC3 Plenary Speakers and other facets of the Congress.

Advertisements

Plenary Focus: Dr. Elliott Norse Emphasizes Big Ideas & Large-Scale Initiative

Standard

by Samantha Oester 

Dr. Elliott Norse, marine conservation scientist and policy , will be featured as a plenary speaker at the 3rd International Marine Conservation Congress in August 2014. (Photo courtesy of Marine Conservation Institute)

Dr. Elliott Norse, marine conservation scientist and policy , will be featured as a plenary speaker at the 3rd International Marine Conservation Congress in August 2014.
(Photo courtesy of Marine Conservation Institute)

Dr. Elliott Norse said it has taken several decades of academic training, research and career experience to learn to “save the diversity of life in a perilous, complex, anthropocentric world.” His history includes a Ph.D. from the University of Southern California and a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Iowa, as well as work at the US Environmental Protection Agency, White House Council on Environmental Quality, Ecological Society of America, The Wilderness Society and Ocean Conservancy. He founded the Marine Conservation Institute in 1996, where he is currently Chief Scientist. He is considered an expert in marine biology, marine conservation, environmental policy and conservation strategy.

Norse will be speaking at the 3rd International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC3) in a speech titled, “A RAM-sized vision to save the world’s marine species.” This talk is in honor of his late friend and colleague Dr. Ransom A Myers. Norse explained that marine life is more imperiled than when he began as a marine scientist, that “ignorance and short-sightedness are our worst enemies,” and that working together is far more effective in saving the world’s oceans. “To succeed we need to go big, regional, at very least, or global, to win enduring conservation for the world’s oceans,” Norse declared. “We won’t get many chances. We need to be smart enough to get it right the first time. That’s why I’ve synthesized all I’ve learned in my career to talk with IMCC3 participants about the most important thing we will ever do: create the Global Ocean Refuge System (GLORES), the oceans’ in situ equivalent of the Global Seed Vault in Svalbard, to be the safety net for the Earth’s marine life.”

Norse is lauded as one of the world’s top marine conservation scientists. He is a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation and was President of the Society for Conservation Biology’s Marine Section. He received the Nancy Foster Award for Habitat Conservation from the National Marine Fisheries Service and was named Brooklyn College 2008 Distinguished Alumnus. Additionally, he was awarded the 2012 Chairman’s Medal from the Seattle Aquarium.

Norse emphasized the importance of effective working relationships and is appreciative of the invitation to speak at IMCC in honor of Myers. Norse stated, “I feel deeply honored to be chosen as the Ransom A. Myers Memorial Lecturer to old friends and new friends at IMCC3. I hope RAM’s vision and the vision in this talk will inspire [everyone] to contribute to saving marine life, as we, marine conservation scientists, are uniquely equipped to do.”

IMCC3 is honored to have Norse close the conference’s main scientific program.

Norse will be featured as an IMCC3 plenary speaker on 18 August 2014 at the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre in Glasgow as the Dr. Ransom A. Myers Memorial Lecturer. Myers (1952-2007) was a world-renowned marine conservation scientist who was cited in Fortune magazine as one of the world’s ten people to watch for working to develop new and better ways to husband the wealth beneath the sea. He was known for his outward passion for marine conservation and his big ideas, projects and initiatives.

Follow Marine Conservation Institute on Twitter @savingoceans.

Samantha Oester is Communications Chair for IMCC3. She can be reached at soester@gmu.edu for information on the IMCC3 Plenary Speakers and other facets of the Congress.

 

Exhibitor Focus: Environmental Artist Featured at IMCC3

Image

Exhibitor Focus: Environmental Artist Featured at IMCC3

Seppo Leinonen is a Finnish artist interested in environmental issues. He studied fine arts and forestry in Helsinki and enjoys the outdoors. He recently participated in the 11th International Mammalogical Congress and is excited to become more involved in marine conservation at IMCC3. You can view more of Seppo’s art on his website SeppoNet and follow him on Twitter @sepponet (IMCC Cartoon by Seppo)

Plenary Focus: Dr. Emily Darling Tackles Climate Change & Coral Reefs

Standard

by Samantha Oester

Image

Dr. Emily S. Darling, community and conservation marine ecologist, will be featured as a plenary speaker at the 3rd International Marine Conservation Congress in August 2014.
(Photo courtesy of Emily Darling)

Dr. Emily S. Darling likens climate change to a horror film for the world’s oceans. Rising ocean temperatures, growing sea levels, ocean acidification and coral bleaching are just a few of the multitude of climate change’s detrimental effects on marine life. “More than ever before, scientists, local stakeholders, NGOs and government agencies need to work together to plan how we are going to protect and manage ecosystems that are fundamentally threatened by a warmer and more acidic ocean,” Darling asserted.

Her current research is dedicated to working toward a climate adaptation plan for coral reefs in the U.S. Pacific. A David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellow with the Society for Conservation Biology, Darling is also working with the World Wildlife Fund, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (U.S.) and the Wildlife Conservation Society in her post-doctoral research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is developing conservation and management solutions for coral reefs. Darling will be speaking at the 3rd International Marine Conservation Congress on climate change, coral reefs and conservation planning.

Darling is a highly regarded marine scientist—she is the recipient of several academic and research-based awards, including the Governor General’s Gold Medal for distinction in doctoral research for her dissertation at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada. As a community and conservation ecologist, she works to understand and mitigate human impacts on marine ecosystems, such as climate change. Darling is also interested in the use of social media in cultivating online science communities and will include the topic of global networks of scientists in her IMCC3 speech. “I am incredibly honored to be asked to speak at IMCC3,” Darling stated. “I’m looking forward to connecting with scientists, managers, decision makers and the general public about how we are going to tackle climate change as a community.”

Darling will be featured as an IMCC3 plenary speaker on 14 August 2014 at the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre in Glasgow.

Find out more about Darling’s research at www.emilysdarling.com and follow her on Twitter @emilysdarling.

Samantha Oester is Communications Chair for IMCC3. She can be reached at soester@gmu.edu.

Help Sponsor IMCC3 Delegates from Developing Countries

Standard

Furthering marine conservation in developing countries is incredibly important for global and local conservation, local economies and more. This campaign is to to help sponsor delegates from developing countries to attend the International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC), so they can bring back knowledge, skills and tools to further marine conservation in their countries, as well as present their marine conservation issues and projects to marine scientists from around the world.

IMCC provides tangible outcomes in the advancement of marine science and marine conservation. Delegates from developing countries who attend IMCC make important contacts with international organizations who may help further their work, gain knowledge of successful marine conservation strategies, gain skills and access to tools to help marine conservation in their countries and present on issues and stories from their countries to make public their needs and efforts.

Improving marine conservation impacts many facets of life. In many developing countries, as well as others, improving marine conservation also leads to the betterment of public health issues, better management of fisheries leading to increased access to food sources, improved local and national economies, job creation and more. 

Want to help sponsor IMCC3 delegates from developing countries?

Currently, there are two ways to contribute.

1) You can order an exclusive IMCC 2014 pre-congress shirt from our Teespring campaign at Image http://teespring.com/IMCC2014. There are unisex, women’s, fitted, long-sleeved and v-neck styles available. Anyone who orders shirts can send a selfie of you wearing the shirt to IMCC3 Communications Officer Samantha Oester at soester@gmu.edu, to be featured on our social media outlets and blog showing your IMCC pride!

2) You can contribute through our Indiegogo campaign. There are perks for different levels of contribution, including social media shout-outs, featuring your marine photography and being named an official sponsor of IMCC!

All proceeds from these campaigns will go to sponsor marine conservation delegates from developing countries. More fundraisers are coming soon, so check back on our site for more ways to help!